Best Cameras For Cinematography

16 Best Cameras For Cinematography

Are you looking for the Best Cameras For Cinematography? Cinematography is an art form that requires exceptional camera gear. A professional-level camera–along with lenses, lighting, and other gear–is the essential tool of the cinematographer’s craft. In order to get the best results, it’s important to choose the right camera for the job.

Today, there is an abundance of cameras on the market that can be used for cinematography. It can be overwhelming to try to choose the right one, but with some research and knowledge, you can find the camera that’s best for you.

This article will explore the 16 best cameras for cinematography, including their pros and cons. We will discuss their features and capabilities, and let you decide which one is best for your particular project.

1. ARRI Alexa Mini

The ARRI Alexa Mini is one of the most popular cameras for filmmakers. It has a Super 35mm CMOS sensor and is capable of recording up to 200fps in ProRes and 60fps in ARRIRAW. Its small form-factor makes it perfect for handheld, gimbal and aerial work. With its many features and high-end quality, the Alexa Mini is a perfect camera for both indie-style filmmaking and higher-budget productions.

Pros

– Super 35mm sensor
– Records up to 200fps in ProRes
– Records up to 60fps in ARRIRAW
– Excellent low-light performance
– Small form-factor makes it great for handheld, gimbal and aerial work
– Amazing color science

Cons

– Expensive
– No built-in ND filters
– Lacks some more advanced features

2. Sony Venice

The Sony Venice is a large-format digital motion picture camera that is designed to shoot cinema-grade productions. It has a Super 35mm sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in ProRes and 16fps in RAW. The Venice also has great low-light performance, built-in ND filters, and the ability to record in both 4K and 6K resolutions. With its high-end capabilities, the Sony Venice is a great option for professional filmmakers.

Pros

– Super 35mm sensor
– Records up to 60fps in ProRes
– Records up to 16fps in RAW
– Excellent low-light performance
– Built-in ND filters
– Capable of 4K and 6K resolutions

Cons

– Expensive
– Heavy and bulky
– No crop recording

3. RED Weapon Monstro 8K VV

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The RED Weapon Monstro 8K VV is the latest and greatest from RED Digital Cinema. It has a 35.4MP Monstro sensor and is capable of recording up to 300fps in REDCODE RAW and 27fps in 8K Full Format. The Monstro also has a very high dynamic range and is capable of recording both REDRAW and Apple ProRes. It’s the perfect choice for high-end, cinema-style productions.

Pros

– 35.4MP Monstro sensor
– Records up to 300fps in REDCODE RAW
– Records up to 27fps in 8K Full Format
– Very high dynamic range
– Capable of recording both REDRAW and Apple ProRes

Cons

– Expensive
– Heavy and bulky
– Takes up a lot of storage space

4. Canon EOS C100 Mark II

The Canon EOS C100 Mark II is a great mid-range camera for filmmakers. It has an 8.3MP Super 35mm sensor and is capable of recording up to 1080/60p in AVCHD and 1920×1080/30p in MP4. The C100 Mark II also has a number of useful features such as Dual Pixel Autofocus and support for Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma. It’s a great choice for indie filmmakers, students, and any other filmmakers on a budget.

Pros

– 8.3MP Super 35mm sensor
– Records up to 1080/60p in AVCHD
– Records up to 1920×1080/30p in MP4
– Dual Pixel Autofocus
– Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma
– Low price-point

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– No built-in ND filters
– Poor low-light performance

5. Canon EOS C200

The Canon EOS C200 is Canon’s top-of-the-line professional cinema camera. It has a Super 35mm CMOS sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4K and 12fps in RAW. The C200 also has a number of useful features such as Dual Pixel Autofocus, 12 stops of dynamic range, and support for both Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma. It’s a great camera for both indie filmmakers and larger production companies.

Pros

– Super 35mm CMOS sensor
– Records up to 60fps in 4K
– Records up to 12fps in RAW
– Dual Pixel Autofocus
– 12 stops of dynamic range
– Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma

Cons

– Expensive
– No built-in ND filters
– Poor low-light performance

6. Sony A7s II

The Sony A7s II is a great camera for documentary filmmakers and run-and-gun-style shooters. It has a 12.2MP full-frame sensor and is capable of recording up to 30fps in 4K and 120fps in Full HD. The A7s II is also a great low-light camera and has a number of useful features such as an amazing 5-axis in-body stabilization system and slo-mo capabilities.

Pros

– 12.2MP full-frame sensor
– Records up to 30fps in 4K
– Records up to 120fps in Full HD
– Great low-light performance
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Slo-mo capabilities

Cons

– No built-in ND filters
– Limited dynamic range
– Poor rolling shutter performance

7. Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is a great camera for indie filmmakers on a budget. It has a Super 16mm sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4K and 12fps in RAW. The Pocket Cinema Camera also has a number of nice features such as dual native ISO and 3D LUTs. It’s a great choice for filmmakers who need high-quality images without busting the budget.

Pros

– Super 16mm sensor
– Records up to 60fps in 4K
– Records up to 12fps in RAW
– Dual native ISO
– 3D LUTs
– Low price-point

Cons

– Poor low-light performance
– Limited dynamic range
– Poor rolling shutter performance

8. Panasonic Lumix GH5s

The Panasonic Lumix GH5s is a great camera for vloggers and filmmakers who need a compact, lightweight camera. It has a 10.2MP Micro Four Thirds sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4K and 120fps in Full HD. The GH5s also has a number of useful features such as dual native ISO and 5-axis in-body stabilization system. It’s a great choice for filmmakers who need a powerful, portable camera.

Pros

– 10.2MP Micro Four Thirds sensor
– Records up to 60fps in 4K
– Records up to 120fps in Full HD
– Dual native ISO
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Compact, lightweight form-factor

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– Poor low-light performance
– Poor rolling shutter performance

9. Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro

The Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro is a great camera for indie filmmakers and larger production companies. It has a 4.6K Super 35mm sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4.6K and 30fps in RAW. The URSA Mini Pro also has a number of useful features such as 12G-SDI, 15 stops of dynamic range, and an impressive low-light performance.

Pros

– 4.6K Super 35mm sensor
– Records up to 60fps in 4.6K
– Records up to 30fps in RAW
– 12G-SDI
– 15 stops of dynamic range
– Excellent low-light performance

Cons

– Expensive
– Heavy and bulky
– Poor rolling shutter performance

10. Sony FS5

The Sony FS5 is a great camera for documentary filmmakers and run-and-gun-style shooters. It has a Super 35mm camera and is capable of recording up to 30fps in 4K and 120fps in Full HD. The FS5 also has a number of useful features such as an amazing 5-axis in-body stabilization system and slo-mo capabilities.

Pros

– Super 35mm camera
– Records up to 30fps in 4K
– Records up to 120fps in Full HD
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Slo-mo capabilities
– Compact, lightweight form-factor

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– Poor low-light performance
– Poor rolling shutter performance

11. Canon EOS R

The Canon EOS R is a great camera for both cinema and photography uses. It has a 30.3MP full-frame sensor and is capable of recording up to 30fps in 4K and 10fps in RAW. The EOS R also has a number of great features such as Dual Pixel Autofocus, Dual Image Stabilization, and support for Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma.

Pros

– 30.3MP full-frame sensor
– Records up to 30fps in 4K
– Records up to 10fps in RAW
– Dual Pixel Autofocus
– Dual Image Stabilization
– Canon Log and Wide DR Gamma

Cons

– No built-in ND filters
– Limited dynamic range
– Poor rolling shutter performance

12. RED Helium 8K

The RED Helium 8K is RED’s top-of-the-line digital cinema camera. It has a 33.2MP Helium sensor and is capable of recording up to 120fps in 8K and 300fps in 4K. The Helium 8K also has a number of great features such as 15 stops of dynamic range, dual native ISO, and support for both REDCODE RAW and Apple ProRes.

Pros

– 33.2MP Helium sensor
– Records up to 120fps in 8K
– Records up to 300fps in 4K
– 15 stops of dynamic range
– Dual native ISO
– Capable of recording both REDCODE RAW and Apple ProRes

Cons

– Expensive
– Heavy and bulky
– Poor low-light performance

13. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is a great camera for wedding and event videographers. It has a 30.4MP full-frame sensor and is capable of recording up to 30fps in 4K and 12fps in RAW. The 5D Mark IV is also a great low-light camera and has a number of useful features such as Dual Pixel Autofocus and 10-bit output.

Pros

– 30.4MP full-frame sensor
– Records up to 30fps in 4K
– Records up to 12fps in RAW
– Great low-light performance
– Dual Pixel Autofocus
– 10-bit output

Cons

– No built-in ND filters
– Limited dynamic range
– Poor rolling shutter performance

14. Panasonic Lumix GH5

The Panasonic Lumix GH5 is a great camera for documentary filmmakers and run-and-gun-style shooters. It has a 20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensor and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4K and 180fps in Full HD. The GH5 also has a number of useful features such as dual native ISO, 5-axis in-body stabilization system and slo-mo capabilities.

Pros

– 20.3MP Micro Four Thirds sensor
– Records up to 60fps in 4K
– Records up to 180fps in Full HD
– Dual native ISO
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Slo-mo capabilities

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– Poor low-light performance
– Poor rolling shutter performance

15. Sony FS7

The Sony FS7 is a great camera for documentary filmmakers, wedding videographers, and event videographers. It has a Super 35mm camera and is capable of recording up to 60fps in 4K and 120fps in Full HD. The FS7 also has a number of useful features such as an amazing 5-axis in-body stabilization system and slo-mo capabilities.

Pros

– Super 35mm camera
– Records up to 60fps in 4K
– Records up to 120fps in Full HD
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Slo-mo capabilities
– Capable of slow-motion capture

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– Poor low-light performance
– Poor rolling shutter performance

16. Panasonic Lumix GH4

The Panasonic Lumix GH4 is a great camera for documentary filmmakers and run-and-gun-style shooters. It has a 16.05MP Micro Four Thirds sensor and is capable of recording up to 30fps in 4K and 96fps in Full HD. The GH4 also has a number of useful features such as dual native ISO, 5-axis in-body stabilization system, and a variety of video formats.

Pros

– 16.05MP Micro Four Thirds sensor
– Records up to 30fps in 4K
– Records up to 96fps in Full HD
– Dual native ISO
– 5-axis in-body stabilization system
– Variety of video formats

Cons

– Limited dynamic range
– Poor low-light performance
– Poor rolling shutter performance

Final Thoughts On Best Cameras For Cinematography

Choosing the right camera for your project is a very important decision. As you can see, there are many great cameras on the market that are perfect for cinematography. From high-end cinema cameras to budget-friendly options, there is something for every type of filmmaker.

The 16 cameras discussed in this article offer a great variety of features and capabilities. Which one is best for you will ultimately depend on your budget, needs, and the specific project you are working on. Take your time and do your research, and you should be able to find the perfect camera that will help you create amazing cinematic images.

Ken Marshall

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